IPA Awardees for December 2014

Maragtas S.V. Amante
School of Labor and Industrial Relations (SOLAIR)
UP Diliman

“Globalization and Industrial Relations in the Philippines” in The Multi-Dimensions of Industrial Relations in the Asian Knowledge-Based Economics. Sununta Siengthai, John J. Lawler, Chris Rowley and Hiromasa Suzuki (editors). Oxford: Chandos Publishing, 2010.

Maragtas S.V. Amante
School of Labor and Industrial Relations (SOLAIR)
UP Diliman

“Offshored Work in Philippine BPOs” in Offshoring and Working Conditions in Remote Work. Jon C. Messenger and Naj Ghosheh (editors). Geneva, Switzerland: International Labor Organization (ILO) & Palgrave MacMillan, 2010.

Aileen S.P. Baviera
Asian Center
UP Diliman

“Changing Dynamics in Philippines-China-US Relations: The Impact of the South China Sea Dispute” in New Dynamics in US-China Relations: Contending for the Asia-Pacific. Li Mingjiang and Kalyan M. Kemburi (editors). London and New York: Routledge Taylor and Francis Group, 2015.

Luisa A. Gelisan
Multimedia Center
UP Open University

“Use of Lecture/Tutorial Web Streaming in Distance e-learning” in Emerging Modes and Approaches in Open and Flexible Education. Kam Cheong Li and Kin Sun Yuen (editors). Hong Kong: Open University of Hong Kong Press, 2014.

Paul Leonard Atchong C. Hilario and Giovanni A. Tapang
National Institute of Physics
College of Science
UP Diliman

Independent Light Fields Generated Using a Phase-only Spatial Light Modulator. Optics Letters, 39 (7): 2036-2039, 1 April 2014.

While the typical familiar LCD projector show moving images on a single flat screen, researchers from the National Institute of Physics have developed a way to create different patterns simultaneously on multiple screens separated from each other. This paves the way for the realization of faster three-dimensional projectors. The authors used wavefront engineering to simultaneously project images onto different screens along an axis. Wavefront engineering manipulates light so that they can change the time at which it arrives at point. Borrowing techniques from signal processing and using a device called a spatial light modulator to be able to control light propagation, the researchers have projected the words ‘S’, ‘Y’, ‘N’and ‘C’onto locations separated 10 cm away from each other. Using wavefront engineering, we can generate multiple target patterns and control their shape and positions individually. They have also shown that they can change the patterns independently of each other. This capability essentially allows them to simultaneously project movies on different rows in a movie theater. This technique has variety of uses. Further support is needed to make it applicable to its intended use and to make them accessible to the end users as a commercial technique. Further support is also needed to make it useful for other forms of electromagnetic waves.

Link to the article: http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ol/abstract.cfm?uri=ol-39-7-2036
2013/2014 Impact Factor: 3.179

Erniel B. Barrios
School of Statistics
UP Diliman

Effects of Canned Pineapple Consumption on Nutritional Status, Immunomodulation, and Physical Health of Selected School Children. Journal of  Nutrition and Metabolism, Article ID 861659, 9 pages, 2014.

Pineapple contains several phytochemicals like coumaricacid, ferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, and ellagic acid, as well asmicronutrientssuch as vitaminC, manganese, thiamin, riboflavin, pyridoxine, copper,and dietary fiber. Regular intake of pineapple may increase consumption of these phytochemicals and micronutrients and potentially influence some immunological markers and help improve the child’s physical health.This research was done to determine the effect of nine-week canned pineapple consumption on various immune markers, nutritional status, and physical health of selected school children.Consumption of canned pineapple may reduce incidence and duration of viral and bacterial infections.

Link to the article: http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jnme/2014/861659/abs/
Impact Factor: Not yet available

Dennis Andrew S. Aguinaldo
Department of Humanities
College of Arts and Sciences
UP Los Baños

Madrid 1884 & Tondo 1892. Kritika Kultura, 23: 402-417, 2014.

Akin to our projected form, many layers, cover-ups, and erasures inform the creation and translation of Philippine history, its earmarked names, its speech and color, whatever we figure from or into it—generation after generation, again and again—in the service of its construction. The current generation provides yet another membrane, a type of connection that indeed maintains its own capacity for neglect: the pages of the Internet. So we sought online accounts about these definitive hours of our history. I erased, my compatriot drew and drew out, and in this manner did we lay down this rereading of rereadings.

Link to the article: http://kritikakultura.ateneo.net/images/pdf/KK23/Paginated/23%20Acuna%20Aguinaldo%20402-417.pdf
Impact Factor: Not yet available

Abigail D. Trinidad
Institute of Biology
College of Science
UP Diliman

Isolation of Acanthamoeba Genotype T4 from a Non-Contact Lens Wearer from the Philippines. Tropical Medicine and Health, 42 (4): 145-147, 2014.

Free-living amoebae from the genus Acanthamoeba have been reported to cause diseases in humans such as granulomatous amebic encephalitis and Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). Of the two, the number of people afflicted with AK is on the rise, which is correlated to the increasing number of people wearing contact lenses. In this study, Acanthamoeba was isolated from the eyes of an AK patient that is a non-contact lens wearer. The patient had denied having any trauma to the eye, but only recalled washing his eyes with tap water. By amplifying a portion of the isolated specimen’s 18S ribosomal DNA, the specimen was identified as belonging to the T4 genotype, which is a genotype associated with most human infections. This report shows that aside from wearing of contact lens or corneal trauma, exposure to contaminated water can also be a cause of Acanthamoeba infection.

Link to the article: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4253062/
Impact Factor: Not yet available

Bing Baltazar C. Brillo
Institute of Governance and Rural Development
College of Public Affairs and Development
UP Los Baños

Shifting Economic Regimes for Retail in the Philippines: External Impetus Amidst the Workings of Domestic Politics. International Review of Retail, Distribution and Consumer Research, 24 (5): 516-530, 2014.

In the prevailing globalized world order, shifting economic regimes is principally understood via the overriding-external-impetus lens where international demand holds sway over domestic policy making. Considering the complexity of the process and the possibility of varying outcomes, the perspective evidently limits the function of domestic politics in changing regimes. In elucidating how the dynamics of domestic politics respond to external impetuses and play out in relation to regime shifts, this paper looks into the two cases of regime shifts in retail in the Philippines: Republic Act (RA) 1180, a protectionist regime enacted in 1954 and RA 8762, a liberalized regime legislated in 2000. The study examines the interface and convergence of three salient factors— external-internal impetus, presidential intervention and the changing dynamics in the retail sector— that were pivotal in both regime shifts. Specifically, the external-internal impetus helped set off the move for regime shift; the sitting President played a crucial role in the success of the legislation in Congress; and the retail sector exemplified varying dynamics (e.g. consolidation in RA 1180 and fragmentation in RA 8762) which facilitated the enactment of the laws. The study also underscores two key points: (1) while the initiative to adopt or change economic regimes for a government will continue to have external impetus, the success of regime shift as well as the substance of its specific policy will be essentially determined by the workings of domestic politics; and (2) the legislative experience characterizes the contemporary link between global influence and domestic dynamics in policy making. The paper closes with a note on the case study’s implications on retail globalization in Southeast Asia.

Link to the article: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/09593969.2014.970211
Impact Factor: Not yet available

Inocencio E. Buot Jr.
Institute of Biological Sciences
College of Arts and Sciences
UP Los Baños

Connecting Fragmented Mangrove Patches Using Biodiversity of Ranong Coastal Landscape, Thailand. Journal of Wetlands Biodiversity, 4: 7-15, 2014.

This study was conducted in Ranong mangrove forest, in southern Thailand to connect isolated or fragmented mangrove patches with a biodiversity corridor serving as natural bridges. Six mangrove patches have been selected based on remotely sensed data of Landsat–5 TM output derived from digital image processing technique to determine the gaps for each mangrove patch. We found six dominant mangrove species namely: Avicennia marina, A. officinalis, Bruguiera parviflora, Ceriops decandra, Rhizophora apiculata and R. mucronata. These species are best for planting on the identified stepping stone and linear corridors. The biodiversity corridor in Ranong plays an important role in enhancing the dispersal of organisms through habitat patches in fragmented coastal landscape and serves as routes for daily or seasonal movements.

Link to the article: http://www.muzeulbrailei.ro/images/naturale/Volum%204/01InocencioBuotFinal.pdf
Impact Factor: Not yet available