IPA Awardees for February 2014

Inggat Laya N. Casilagan and Marie Antonette Junio-Meñez
Marine Science Institute
College of Science
UP Diliman

Genetic Diversity, Population Structure, and Demographic History of Exploited Sea Urchin Populations (Tripneustes gratilla) in the Philippines. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 449: 284-293, November 2013.

The sea urchin, Tripneustes gratilla, has been known for its ecological and economic importance throughout the Indo-Pacific region. In the Philippines, T. gratilla is the most high-valued and overexploited commercial sea urchin species. We use population genetic methods to identify stocks and examine the historical demographic trend in exploited populations.  Sea urchins collected from localities within and outside western Luzon region were sequenced for mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (CO1) gene and genotyped for seven microsatellite loci. Both markers did not identify separate genetic stocks indicating extensive gene exchange among populations, or that populations have high genetic diversity and not yet attained genetic equilibrium. Interestingly, inferences on the demographic history from the two types of markers were discordant. Analysis of mitochondrial sequences revealed population growth during the Pleistocene while microsatellite data detected population decline. Further analysis suggests that the Pleistocene population expansion occurred before the more recent population decline, but other hypotheses for these discordant results were also presented. Management insights were also provided based on the results of the study which could be integrated with other information (i.e. recruitment patterns, demographic data) to facilitate the development of an effective management scheme for the sustainability of T. gratilla fisheries in the Philippines.

 

Link to the article: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022098113003316
Impact Factor: 2.263

Rosario R. Rubite
Department of Biology
College of Arts and Sciences
UP Manila

Recircumscription of Begonia sect. Baryandra (Begoniaceae): Evidence from Molecular Data. Botanical Studies, 54: 38, 5 pages, September 2013.

A natural classification for a much expanded Begonia sect. Baryandra has been provided. A total of 49 species is now considered to belong to the section, which has its centre of diversity in the Philippines but also with some representatives in Borneo and New Guinea. This paper highlights the feasibility of moving towards a natural classification of Asian Begonia step by step as information comes to light through building upon previous framework phylogenies with denser sampling.

Link to the article: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/1999-3110-54-38#page-1
Impact Factor: 0.864

Rosario R. Rubite
Department of Biology
College of Arts and Sciences
UP Manila

Phylogenetic Analyses of Begonia sect. Coelocentrum and Allied Limestone Species of China Shed Light on the Evolution of Sino-Vietnamese karst flora. Botanical Studies, 55 (1): 15 pages, January 2014.

Based on our phylogenetic study, Begonia sect. Coelocentrum is recircumscribed and expanded to include other. Because species of Clade SVLB have strong niche conservatism to retain in their ancestral habitats in cave-like microhabitats and Begonia are generally poor dispersers prone to diversify allopatrically, we propose that extensive and continuous karstification of the Sino-Vietnamese limestone region facilitated by the onset of East Asian monsoon since the late Miocene has been the major driving force for species accumulation via geographic isolation in Clade SVLB.

Link to the article: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/1999-3110-55-1
Impact Factor: 0.864

Rosario R. Rubite
Department of Biology
College of Arts and Sciences
UP Manila

Begonia section Petermannia of Luzon Island, the Philippines. Philippine Journal of Science, 142: 183-197, Special Issue, November 2013. 

Following a systematic study of Philippine Begonia section Baryandra, an initial revision of Begonia section Petermannia on Luzon Island is presented. Using field surveys in order to find as many species as possible, sixteen species are rediscovered in pristine forests of Luzon Island. Thirteen species are endemic to Luzon and ten are known from fewer than four localities. In the wild, many of these species were found to be represented by one population only. These results contribute not only to the future phylogenetic studies of the genus Begonia, but also to help define and refine conservation policies in the Philippines in order to offer better protection for narrowly endemic plant taxa.

Link to the article: Not yet available
Impact Factor: Not yet available

Ma. Vivian C. Camacho and Pablo P. Ocampo
Institute of Biological Sciences
College of Arts and Sciences
UP Los Baños

Morphometric and Morphomeristic Variations of Five Populations of Indigenous Celebes Goby, Glossogobius celebius (Perciformes: Gobiidae) from Southern Luzon, Philippines. Philippine Agricultural Scientist, 96 (1): 75-85, March 2013.

Continued threats from human activities pose a level of uncertainty on the survival of the Philippine celebes goby (Glossogobius celebius) and, therefore, it has become increasingly important to assess its population structure and current conservation status. One very useful method in understanding the population structure is through evaluation of morphology or physical characteristic of populations from different areas. It could provide valuable information on fish biology, a prerequisite for the conservation and stock enhancement program of this goby. The study aimed to assess the morphological variations among G. celebius populations collected from five water bodies in Southern Luzon, Philippines. Twenty-five metric (measurable) and nine meristic (countable) characters were statistically analyzed. Differences between stream gobies (found in Alitaaw, Dampalit, and Pansipit) and lake gobies (found in Taal and Laguna) were determined. Among the metric characters, fin lengths were the main reasons of population variation, with stream gobies having larger measurements for such traits. Varying flow rates and temperatures at the collection sites are believed to be the main causes of this variation. Fin morphology of celebes goby changes in response to its environment. The meristic characters, however, were comparable among and between populations.

 

Link to the article: http://journals.uplb.edu.ph/index.php/PAS/article/view/880
Impact Factor: 0.315

John Ian K. Boongaling
Department of Humanities
College of Arts and Sciences
UP Los Baños

Russell and Strawson on Definite Descriptions: The Principle of Charity and its Role in the Appraisal of a Philosophical Theory. Filosofia Unisinos, 14 (3): 189-203, September-December 2013. 

The principle of charity is an important norm of philosophical inquiry and conversational practice. It requires that we take the more/most plausible interpretation of other people’s words and thoughts so as to ascribe to them the greatest possible consistency and rationality. To highlight the importance of the principle of charity in the appraisal of a philosophical theory, this paper examines the arguments presented by Strawson against Russell’s theory of definite descriptions. The paper shows that: (i) Strawson’s arguments are not sufficient to demolish Russell’s theory of definite descriptions; (ii) the main reason for (i) is Strawson’s failure to adopt the more/most charitable interpretation of Russell’s theory; (iii) the crucial element which Strawson should have considered in evaluating Russell’s theory so as to comply with the demands of the principle of charity is Russell’s epistemological concern (or project) since this is its proper context.

Link to the article: http://www.revistas.unisinos.br/index.php/filosofia/article/view/fsu.2013.143.02
Impact Factor: Not yet available

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