IPA Recipients for August 2016

Laura J. Pham
BIOTECH
UP Los Baños

Pili (Canarium ovatum)” in Industrial Oil Crops. Thomas A. McKeon, Douglas G. Hayes, David F. Hildebrand and Randall J. Weselake (editors). London, United Kingdom: Academic Press, 2016. 

Laura J. Pham
BIOTECH
UP Los Baños

“Coconut (Cocos nucifera)” in Industrial Oil Crops. Thomas A. McKeon, Douglas G. Hayes, David F. Hildebrand and Randall J. Weselake (editors). London, United Kingdom: Academic Press, 2016. 

Wilson M. Tan
Department of Computer Science
College of Engineering
UP Diliman

On the Design of An Energy-Harvesting Noise-Sensing WSN Mote. EURASIP Journal on Wireless Communications and Networking, 167 (1): 18 pages, December 2014.

In this article we explore how an energy-harvesting WSN node for noise sensing is designed, as well as test the capabilities of such a system.

Link to the article: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/1687-1499-2014-167
Impact Factor: (2014) 0.724

Marvin M. Flores and Eric A. Galapon
National Institute of Physics
College of Sciences
UP Diliman

Mixtures of Maximally Entangled Pure States. Annals of Physics, 372: 297–308, September 2016. 

Quantum entanglement is used as a resource for different quantum information phenomena. Hence, the ability to tell whether a given state is entangled or not is of paramount importance. Unfortunately, the problem of entanglement detection (and its equivalent problem of constructing separability criteria) is hard, more so for the case of mixed states. This is where our research comes in. We were able to come up with a very simple sufficient condition that guarantees a mixed state to be entangled based on the number of maximally entangled pure states in the mixture and their dimension.

Link to the article: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003491616300744
Impact Factor: (2015/2016) 2.375

Marilyn A. Tan
Department of Pediatrics and Neurosciences
College of Medicine
UP Manila

Risk of Recurrent Arterial Ischemic Stroke in Childhood. Stroke, 47 (1): 53-59, January 2016.

Catchy title of research: Risk of repeated stroke in children

Stroke can occur repeatedly in children with cumulative rate of 12% at 1-year. Children with cerebral arteriopathy are at highest risk including those with moya-moya, transient cerebral angiopathy and arterial dissection. Continued monitoring of patients and secondary stroke prevention using anti-thrombotic agents are important.

Link to the article: http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/47/1/53.short
Impact Factor: (2015/2016) 5.787

Mary Jane S. Apines-Amar
Institute of Aquaculture
College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences
UP Visayas

Use of Thraustochytrid Schizochytrium sp. As Source of Lipid and Fatty Acid in a Formulated Diet for Abalone Haliotis asinina (Linnaeus) Juveniles. Aquaculture International, 24 (4): 1103–1118, August 2016.

Catchy title of research: Marine microalgae, Schizochytrium sp., a good source of lipids for juvenile abalone diets

The effects of Schizochytrium sp. as source of lipids and fatty acids for juvenile abalone were investigated by measuring performance indices like growth, survival, body composition, and salinity tolerance. Three diets were compared in which diet 1 contained cod liver oil and soybean oil at 1:1 ratio as the lipid source, diet 2 included Schizochytrium sp added at 2 percent as the lipid source, and diet 3 was a natural diet of red seaweeds, Gracilariopsis heteroclada serving as the control. Growth and survival did not vary among the diet groups. However, a 96-h salinity stress test showed that juvenile abalone survival was highest in diet 2 at 84 percent versus diets 1 and 3 with only 42 percent. Good growth and high tolerance to low salinity of juvenile abalone fed on diet 1 could be due the high levels of essential fatty acids (DHA and EPA) and the high proportion of DHA to EPA. The present study suggests that Schizochytrium oil can replace cod liver oil and soybean oil in abalone diets and can support good growth and survival of abalone comparable to those fed natural seaweeds diet. This result could pave the way for the development of cost-effective complete diets for abalone.

Link to the article: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10499-016-9974-3
Impact Factor: (2015/2016) 0.960

Pompe C. Sta Cruz
Crop Science Cluster
College of Agriculture
UP Los Baños

Effect of Pre-Emergence Herbicides and Timing of Soil Saturation on the Control of Six Major Rice Weeds and their Phytotoxic Effects on Rice Seedlings. Crop Protection, 83: 37–47, May 2016. 

The efficacy of different herbicides in combination with the timing of soil saturation (flooding) for controlling the emergence and survival of six major weeds, and their toxic effect on the rice crop was evaluated. Oxadiazon, pendimethalin and pretichlor completely (100%) controlled Echinochloa colona; Echinochloa crus-galli, Leptochloa chinensis, Cyperus iria, and Amaranthus spinosus. On the other hand, only oxadiazon and pretichlor completely controlled Murdannia nudiflora. Pendimethalin and oxadiazon reduce rice plant survival, and this is more severed with increasing herbicide rate and when saturation of the soil with water (flooding) when done as early as 1 day after application of herbicides resulted to improvement of rice seedling survival. Saturation from 3 to 7 days after spraying herbicides resulted to improvement of rice seedling survival. Thus toxicity of the herbicides on the rice seeling is reduced by delaying soil saturation with water within the 7 days after herbicide application. Hence, not all herbicides can control the six weeds that are evaluated in the study. Soil water content (saturation) and herbicide rate affect the degree of toxicity of herbicides evaluated on rice seedling, such that application of herbicides at optimum rates should be coupled with avoidance of saturating the soil by at least 7 days after herbicide application. 

Link to the article: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0261219416300126
Impact Factor: (2015/2016) 1.652

Cerrone S. Cabanos, Roberta N. Garcia and Evelyn Mae Tecson-Mendoza
Crop Science Cluster
College of Agriculture
UP Los Baños

Compositional Analysis of Transgenic Papaya with Delayed Ripening Trait. Philippine Agricultural Scientist, 96 (4): 331-339, December 2013.

Catchy title of research: Transgenic papaya with delayed ripening trait shows similar proximate composition with non-transgenic fruits

Figure 1. Transgenic papaya in the BL2 greenhouse.

Figure 2. Transgenic papaya fruits with delayed ripening trait.

Figure 2. Transgenic papaya fruits with delayed ripening trait.

Postharvest losses of papaya can reach 30%–40% of production. Thus, we developed transgenic papaya varieties with longer shelf life to allow storage and transport of papaya fruits for longer periods or longer distances while maintaining superior fruit quality. We suppressed the production of ethylene in the fruit during ripening by blocking the synthesis and, thus, the activity of a key enzyme, the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS), at the gene level by introducing the ripening-related acs2 in the reverse orientation using particle bombardment. Selected transgenic lines bore fruits which stayed firm longer at 5–14 d from full yellow compared with 2–3 d for control papaya.
At three stages of fruit development ( green mature, 10% yellow and 100% yellow), some of the chemical constituents had differences which were statistically significant but all values obtained for the three different lines were quite close (maximum of 12% difference from the control) and within the values in the literature. Beta- carotene and ascorbic acid ranged from 490–769 μg 100 g-1 and 41–80 mg 100 g-1, respectively. BITC contents decreased ten-fold as fruits ripened for both control and transgenic papayas.
The findings indicate that the introduction and expression of the antisense acs and the two marker genes did not produce any major unintended changes in the proximate composition and other chemical constituents in the transgenic papaya with delayed ripening trait. Moreover, transgenic papayas had 3.6–6.7 d from full yellow to ripened stage compared with 2 d for the control. This observed longer time for fruit ripening in the transgenic papayas would reduce postharvest losses during transport and storage, thus, would benefit the papaya industry.

Link to the article: https://journals.uplb.edu.ph/index.php/PAS/article/view/1118
Impact Factor: (2013) 0.368

Pompe C. Sta Cruz
Crop Science Cluster
College of Agriculture
UP Los Baños

Influence of Environmental Factors on the Germination of Urena lobata L. and Its Response to Herbicides. PLoS One, 9 (3): e90305, 8 pages, March 2014.

Catchy title of research: Physiological and morphological responses of IschaemumrugosumSalisb. (wrinkled grass) to different nitrogen rates and rice seeding rates

Afulut Gad (Urenalobata) is becoming a noxious weed in rangelands, pastures, and undisturbed areas in the Philippines. In this study, the effects of seed treatment, cultural practices and environmental conditions on seed germination and emergence of Afulut Gad were determined. Mechanical and chemical seed rubbing resulted to 99 percent seed germination. Soaking of seeds in sodium chloride salt of 0 to 200 mM concentrations at osmotic potential of 0 to 1.6 MPa had different effects on seed germination. Soaking weed seeds in the salt medium, at 0.1 MPa osmotic potential, reduced germination by 50 percent. Some seeds germinated at 0.8 MPa, while none germinated at osmotic potential of 1.6 MPa. Rice straw mulching up to 4 tons per hectare increased rice seedling emergence and biomass, but the effect was not seen at higher amount of rice straw mulching. Placement of weed seeds on the soil surface resulted in 84 percent seedling emergence, which declined with increasing seed burial depth. Increasing the burial depth can decrease the seedling biomass. Post-emergence herbicides such as: bispyribac-sodium, 2,4-D, glyphosate, and thiobencarb + 2,4-D (98%) were also effective in reducing seed growth.

Link to the article: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0090305
Impact Factor: (2014) 3.234

Pompe C. Sta Cruz
Crop Science Cluster
College of Agriculture
UP Los Baños

Influence of Environmental Factors, Cultural Practices, and Herbicide Application on Seed Germination and Emergence Ecology of Ischaemum rugosum Salisb. PLoS One, 10 (9): e0137256, 28 pages, September 2015.

Catchy title of research: Physiological and morphological responses of Ischaemumrugosum Salisb. (wrinkled grass) to different nitrogen rates and rice seeding rates

Wrinkled grass is a competitive weed in direct-seeded rice systems. The growth of wrinkled grass when grown in competition with rice at varying seeding rates (0-100 kilogram per hectare) and nitrogen (N) rates (0-150 kilogram N per hectare) was studied under screenhouse condition. The weed tiller number, leaf number, leaf area, leaf biomass, and flower biomass were reduced when the weed was grown together with rice seeding rates at 25 to 100 kilogram per hectare. However, the growth and biomass of this grass was enhanced with increasing nitrogen rates up to 150 kilogram per hectare. At weed maturity (84 days after sowing), wrinkled grass was as tall as the rice when no nitrogen was applied. With nitrogen application, weeds were taller by 50 percent than rice. Nitrogen application however, increased rice biomass more than weed. Increasing rice plant population correspondingly reduced the height and biomass of wrinkled grass, but the weed was not suppressed completely. Wrinkled grass can cope with the effects of high rice planting by increasing leaf area and specific leaf area development, and allocation more biomass to the leaf. Our results showed that rice crop interference alone may reduce wrinkled grass growth, but may not provide complete control of the weed. Thus, there is a need to combine other ways weed management to effectively control the wrinkled grass.

Link to the article: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0137256
Impact Factor: (2015/2016) 3.057

Pompe C. Sta Cruz
Crop Science Cluster
College of Agriculture
UP Los Baños

Physiological and Morphological Responses of Ischaemum rugosum Salisb. (Wrinkled Grass) to Different Nitrogen Rates and Rice Seeding Rates. PLoS One, 9 (6): e98255, 13 pages, June 2014.

Wrinkled grass is a competitive weed in direct-seeded rice systems. The growth of wrinkled grass when grown in competition with rice at varying seeding rates (0-100 kilogram per hectare) and nitrogen (N) rates (0-150 kilogram N per hectare) was studied under screenhouse condition. The weed tiller number, leaf number, leaf area, leaf biomass, and flower biomass were reduced when the weed was grown together with rice seeding rates at 25 to 100 kilogram per hectare. However, the growth and biomass of this grass was enhanced with increasing nitrogen rates up to 150 kilogram per hectare. At weed maturity (84 days after sowing), wrinkled grass was as tall as the rice when no nitrogen was applied. With nitrogen application, weeds were taller by 50 percent than rice. Nitrogen application however, increased rice biomass more than weed. Increasing rice plant population correspondingly reduced the height and biomass of wrinkled grass, but the weed was not suppressed completely. Wrinkled grass can cope with the effects of high rice planting by increasing leaf area and specific leaf area development, and allocation more biomass to the leaf. Our results showed that rice crop interference alone may reduce wrinkled grass growth, but may not provide complete control of the weed. Thus, there is a need to combine other ways weed management to effectively control the wrinkled grass.

Link to the article: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0098255
Impact Factor: (2014) 3.234

Sir Anril P. Tiatco
Department of Speech Communication and Theatre Arts
College of Arts and Letters
UP Diliman

The Possibilities and Problems of Entanglement in Contemporary Manila Theatre: Pista as Model, Rizal X as Exemplar. Humanities Diliman, 13 (2): 127-162, July-December 2016.

Figure 1. The vignette “Tonight, I Break Some Promises” in Rizal X with Maita Ponce as the bride and Reuben Uy as the groom/Jose Rizal (Photo: Vlad Gonzales)

Figure 1. The vignette “Tonight, I Break Some Promises” in Rizal X with Maita Ponce as the bride and Reuben Uy as the groom/Jose Rizal (Photo: Vlad Gonzales)

In this essay, I use entanglement as a useful concept for the understanding of contemporary theatre in Manila. To illustrate its usefulness, I use the Philippine fiesta as a model of entanglement. The production of Rizal X is used as a case study in the essay.

Link to the article: http://journals.upd.edu.ph/index.php/humanitiesdiliman/article/view/5165/4642
Impact Factor: Not yet available

Fe M. Dela Cueva*, Christian Joseph R. Cumagun, Luis Rey I. Velasco and Teresita U. Dalisay
Crop Science Cluster*
Crop Protection Cluster
College of Agriculture
UP Los Baños

Variability of Sugarcane Smut Pathogen, Ustilago scitaminea Sydow in the Philippines. Philippine Journal of Crop Science, 37 (2): 38-51, August 2012. 

Catchy title of research: Diversity of the fungus Ustilago scitaminea: A threat to the Philippine sugarcane industry

Fig 1. Cultures of U. scitaminea in petri plates.

Fig 1. Cultures of U. scitaminea in petri plates.

Three major groups of the fungus Usitilago scitaminea have been found based on molecular analysis of  96 cultures collected from 17 sugarcane growing areas in the Philippines. Inoculation of the fungus on five varieties of sugarcane revealed seven distinct groups suggesting the diverse population of U. scitaminea in the Philippines. New strains of the pathogen could pose a threat to the Philippine sugarcane industry.

Link to the article: http://isplb03-aux3.semantico.net/abstracts/20123307087.html
Impact Factor: (2012) 0.152

Christian Joseph R. Cumagun
Crop Protection Cluster
College of Agriculture
UP Los Baños

Identification of a Hidden Resistance Gene in Tetraploid Wheat Using Laboratory Strains of Pyricularia oryzae Produced by Backcrossing. Phytopathology, 104 (6): 634-640, June 2014.

Catchy title of research: Plant-fungal interaction studies led to the  discovery of  a hidden resistance gene in wheat 

Fig. 1. Pedigree of representative cultures derived from backcrosses of Avena isolate Br58 with Triticum isolate Br48.

Fig. 1. Pedigree of representative cultures derived from backcrosses of Avena isolate Br58 with Triticum isolate Br48.

Fig .2. Genetic map of the PWT3 region constructed using a BC1F1 population derived from73Q2 × Br48. Markers prefixed with MGM are from Zheng et al.(2008).

Fig .2. Genetic map of the PWT3 region constructed using a BC1F1 population derived from73Q2 × Br48. Markers prefixed with MGM are from Zheng et al.(2008).

In mapping PWT3, an avirulence gene of Avena isolate of M. oryzae on wheat, we discovered that that the fungal gene associated with mycelial color is an avirulence gene under the control of gene-for-gene interactions by identifying its corresponding resistance gene RmgTd(t). Genetic behavior of these complementary genes was observed. RmgTd(t) is located on chromosome 7B and is considered a hidden resistance gene because it does not correspond with PWT3.  Moderate resistance controlled by RmgTd(t) was associated with hypersensitive reaction of mesophyll cells.

Link to the article: http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/doi/abs/10.1094/PHYTO-04-13-0106-R
Impact Factor: (2014) 3.119

Pompe C. Sta Cruz
Crop Science Cluster
College of Agriculture
UP Los Baños

Ecological Significance of Rice (Oryza sativa) Planting Density and Nitrogen Rates in Managing the Growth and Competitive Ability of Itchgrass (Rottboellia cochinchinensis) in Direct-Seeded Rice Systems. Journal of Pest Science, 88 (2): 427–438, June 2015.

Fig. 1 Plant height of both rice and weed (a, b), number of tillers (c, d), and number of leaves (e, f) per plant of Rottboellia cochinchinensis (RC) with different rice planting densities (PD), that is, 0, 100, 200, and 400 plants m−2, at different nitrogen rates (0, 50, 100, and 150 kg ha−1). Vertical bars represent standard error of means. Lines represent a sigmoid model fitted to the plant height of both rice and weed, and tiller and leaf number plant−1 of Rottboellia cochinchinensis data

Fig. 1
Plant height of both rice and weed (a, b), number of tillers (c, d), and number of leaves (e, f) per plant of Rottboellia cochinchinensis (RC) with different rice planting densities (PD), that is, 0, 100, 200, and 400 plants m−2, at different nitrogen rates (0, 50, 100, and 150 kg ha−1). Vertical bars represent standard error of means. Lines represent a sigmoid model fitted to the plant height of both rice and weed, and tiller and leaf number plant−1 of Rottboellia cochinchinensis data

Generally high planting density can suppress weeds, and crop-weed competition can be modified by adjusting nitrogen fertilizer rates. To confirm this understanding on specific weed, a screenhouse study was carried by growing itchgrass (Rottboellia cochinchinensis) alone and in competition with varying rice planting densities (0-400 plants per square meter), and at different nitrogen application rates (0-150 kilogram N per hectare). At 56 days after sowing, itchgrass height, tiller number, leaf number, leaf area, leaf biomass, and flower biomass were reduced with increasing rice plant populations. Without the application of nitrogen, itchgrass plants were taller than rice, and the wee was even taller than rice when nitrogen was applied. Itchgrass has the ability to apportion more of biomass to the leaf. This weed is more responsive to nitrogen fertilizer than rice,thus farmers should give special consideration to the timing of nitrogen fertilizer application when this weed is present in their fields.

Link to the article: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10340-014-0604-4
Impact Factor: (2015/2016) 3.103

Kristel Grace I. Aguilar and Christian Joseph R. Cumagun
Crop Protection Cluster
College of Agriculture
UP Los Baños

Phylogenetic Analysis, Fumonisin Production and Pathogenicity of Fusarium fujikuroi Strains Isolated from Rice in the Philippines. Journal of the Science of Food Agriculture, 93 (12): 3032–3039, September 2013. 

Catchy title of research: Toxins from Fusarium fujikuroi: Is there a link to the degree of infection on the rice plant? 

Fig 1. Stunting and decay of rice seedlings due to F. fujikuroi.

Fig 1. Stunting and decay of rice seedlings due to F. fujikuroi.

Fig 2. Phylogenetic tree showing the relationship between F. fujikuroi and F. proliferatum.

Fig 2. Phylogenetic tree showing the relationship between F. fujikuroi and F. proliferatum.

Fusarium fujikuroi is one of the major pathogens of rice seedlings in the Philippines. The fungus produces significant amounts of fumonisins in corn but minimal in rice.  Although minimal, the risk can be great especially if it infects one of the world’s most important crop. We tested the ability of F. fujikuroi to produce fumonisins using two methods: by ELISA and Real Time RT-PCR and found a good association between the two. The FUM1 gene, a gene responsiblie fot the production of fumonisins was detected in F. fujikuroi in rice. F. fujikuroi is indistinguishable morphologically with F. proliferatum but both are closely related. Phylogenetic analysis  revealed the separation of the these species into two groups.  It was reported previously that the sexual phase of F. fujikuroi is naturally occurring in the field. We confirmed the occurrence of the sexual stage by determining the mating types of the isolates we collected in Nueva Ecija in Centrral Luzon, Philippines. The population consisted of both MAT1 and MAT2 with MAT2 occurrence twice as much than MAT1. Although the ratio is distorted, the finding supported the view that F. fujikuroi is undergoing sexual reproduction in the field.

Link to the article: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jsfa.6136/full
Impact Factor: (2013) 1.879

Paulo C. Cabanero*, Barry Leonard > Tumbokon and Augusto E. Serrano Jr.
Institute of Aquaculture
College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences
National Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology
UP Visayas

Nutritional Evaluation of Rhizoclonium riparium var implexum Meal to Replace Soybean in the Diet of Nile Tilapia Fry. Israeli Journal of Aquaculture – Bamidgeh, 68: 1278, 8 pages, 2016.

Feed for tilapia containing the green seaweed Rhizoclonium riparium.

Feed for tilapia containing the green seaweed Rhizoclonium riparium.

 

Nile tilapia grew better when fed diets containing the green seaweed Rhizoclonium riparium.

Nile tilapia grew better when fed diets containing the green seaweed Rhizoclonium riparium.

Four complete diets containing various amounts of dried crinkle grass 0%, 4.2%, 8.4%, and 12.6% each time replacing the imported soybean meal. The diets containing 0%, 8.4% and 12.6% crinkle grass resulted in bigger and heavier tilapia, and the feed was converted to fish flesh very efficiently but growth rate was not affected by the dietary treatments. Therefore, the crinkle grass which could be found growing rapidly in all idle fishponds could be included in the diet of Nile tilapia to replace the imported soybean meal up to 12.6%, equivalent to 45% soybean meal replacement. This could be an important cost saving  measure for intensive culture of tilapia.

Link to the article: 
Impact Factor: (2015/2016) 0.252

Paulo C. Cabanero*, Barry Leonard > Tumbokon and Augusto E. Serrano Jr.
Institute of Aquaculture
College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences
National Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology
UP Visayas

Lysine Supplementation of the Protein Concentrate of Crinkle Grass Rhizoclonium riparium var implexum as an Ingredient in the Diet of Nile Tilapia Fry. Israeli Journal of Aquaculture – Bamidgeh, 68: 1280, 7 pages, 2016.

Crinkle grass.

Crinkle grass.

 

Dried protein concentrate of crinkle grass

Dried protein concentrate of crinkle grass

An experiment was done in which 4 diets differing in the proportion of the protein concentrate of the crinkle grass at differing amount of lysine were fed to the fry of tilapia everyday for 8 weeks.  Results show that diets with the addition of lysine grew faster and bigger and converted the diet into flesh more efficiently.  Therefore, the crinkle grass which grows in most fishponds not being used and is available year-round can replace the imported soybean meal.  From the experiment, we recommend including 8.4% of the seaweed (by weight) and adding 0.5% lysine will dramatically improve the nutritive value of the diet.

Link to the article: 
Impact Factor: (2015/2016) 0.252

Joseph F. Dela Cruz
Department of Basic Veterinary Sciences
College of Veterinary Medicine
UP Los Baños

Viscum Album Var Hot Water Extract Mediates Anti-Cancer Effects through G1 Phase Cell Cycle Arrest in SK-Hep1 Human Hepatocarcinoma Cells. Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, 16 (15): 6417-6421, 2015. 

Catchy title of research: Hot Water Extract of Mistletoe Mediates Anti-cancer Effects Human Hepatocarcinoma cells

Figure 4. Effect of VAV Hot Water Extract on mRNA Expression of G1 Phase Cell Cycle Related Genes in SK-Hep1 Cell Line.

Figure 4. Effect of VAV Hot Water Extract on mRNA Expression of G1 Phase Cell Cycle Related Genes in SK-Hep1 Cell Line.

Viscum album var (VAV) also known as mistletoe, has long been categorized as a traditional herbal medicine in Asia. In addition to its immunomodulating activities, mistletoe has also been used in the treatment of chronic hepatic disorders in China and Korea. There are numerous reports showing that VAV possesses anti-cancer effects, however influence on human hepatocarcinoma has never been elucidated. In the present study, hot water extracts of VAV was evaluated for its potential anti-cancer effect in vitro. SK-Hep1 cells were treated with VAV (50-400ug/ml) for both 24 and 48 hours then cell viability was measured by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). Flow cytometry analysis was used to measure the proportion of SK-Hep1 in the different stages of cell cycle. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were conducted to measure expression of cell cycle arrest related genes and proteins respectively. VAV dose dependently inhibited the proliferation of SK-Hep1 cells without any cytotoxicity with normal Chang liver cell (CCL-13). Flow cytometry analysis showed that VAV extract inhibited the cell cycle of SK-Hep1 cells via G1 phase arrest. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis both revealed that cyclin dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) and cyclin D1 gene expression were significantly down regulated while p21 was upregulated dose dependently by VAV treatment. Combined down regulation of Cdk2, Cyclin D1 and up regulation of p21 can result in cell death. These results indicate that VAV showed evidence of anti-cancer activity through G1 phase cell cycle arrest in SK-Hep1 cells.

Link to the article: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26434853
Impact Factor: Not yet available

Joseph F. Dela Cruz
Department of Basic Veterinary Sciences
College of Veterinary Medicine
UP Los Baños

Glehnia littoralis Root Extract Induces G0/G1 Phase Cell Cycle Arrest in the MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cell Line. Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, 16 (18): 8113-8117, 2015.

Catchy title of research: Glehnia littoralis Root Extract Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Breast Cancer 

Figure 3. The Effect of Treatment with Glehnia Littoralis Root Extract on mRNA Expressions of Cell Cyclerelated Genes in MCF-7 Cells.

Figure 3. The Effect of Treatment with Glehnia Littoralis Root Extract on mRNA Expressions of Cell Cyclerelated Genes in MCF-7 Cells.

Glehnia littoralis (GL) is widely used as an oriental medicine for cough, fever, stroke and other disease conditions. However, the anti-cancer properties of GL on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells have not been investigated. In order to elucidate anti-cancer properties and underlying cell death mechanisms, MCF-7cells (5 X 104/well) were treated with Glehnia littoralis root extract at 0-400 ug/ml. A hot water extract of GL root inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of the cell cycle after treatment of MCF-7 cells with increasing concentrations of GL root extract for 24 hours showed significant cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis both revealed that GL root extract significantly increased the expression of p21 and p27 with an accompanyingdecrease in both CDK4 and cyclin D1. Our reuslts indicated that GL root extract arrested the proliferation of MCF-7 cells in G1 phase through inhibition of CDK4 and cyclin D1 via increased induction of p21 and p27.

Link to the article: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26745047
Impact Factor: Not yet available

Aileen S.P. Baviera
Asian Center
UP Diliman

The Domestic Mediations of China’s Influence in the Philippines” in Rising China’s Influence in Developing Asia. Evelyn Goh (editor). Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 2016.

Ma. Rosel S. San Pascual
Department of Communication Research
College of Mass Communication
UP Diliman

Paradoxes in the Mobile Parenting Experiences of Filipino Mothers in Diaspora” in Mobile Communication and the Family: Asian Experiences in Technology Domestication. Sun Sun Lim (editor). Dordrecht , The Netherlands: Springer, 2016.

Christian Mark Pelicano, Jenichi Clairvaux Felizco and Mary Donnabelle
Department of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
College of Engineering
UP Diliman

Formation of Copper Oxide Nanostructures by Solution-Phase Method for Antibacterial Application” in Advanced Materials, Structures and Mechanical Engineering. Mosbeh Kaloop (editor). London, United Kingdom: CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group, 2016.

Jenichi Clairvaux Felizco and Mary Donnabelle
Department of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
College of Engineering
UP Diliman

“Electrochemical Study of Cu Nanowire Growth in Aqueous Solution” in Advanced Materials, Structures and Mechanical Engineering. Mosbeh Kaloop (editor). London, United Kingdom: CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group, 2016.

Nathaniel De Guzman and Mary Donnabelle
Department of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
College of Engineering
UP Diliman

“Formation of Silver Nanowires in Ethylene Glycol for Transparent Conducting Electrodes” in Advanced Materials, Structures and Mechanical Engineering. Mosbeh Kaloop (editor). London, United Kingdom: CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group, 2016.

Olivia T. Sison*, Felix Eduardo R. Punzalan*, Nina T. Castillo-Carandang**, Elmer Jasper B. Llanes*, Paul Ferdinand M. Reganit* and Rody G. Sy*
Institute of Clinical Epidemiology*
National Institutes of Health
Department of Medicine**
College of Medicine
UP Manila 

Who We Are: Demographic and Stress Profile on the Philippine LIFECARE Cohort. Acta Medica Philippina, 48 (2): 41-46, 2014.  

Catchy title of research: “WHO WE ARE”

 

Table 1. Frequency and percent distribution of participants by sex for each study site.

Table 1. Frequency and percent distribution of participants by sex for each study site.

Recently, there is emerging interest on the effect of socioeconomic factors and psychosocial stress in the development and progression of heart and vascular diseases.  This report aimed to describe the demographic and stress profile of the participants in the Philippine LIFECARE study sites.  Three thousand seventy two apparently healthy participants, aged 20-50 years old were recruited.    Most of them were females with mean age of 35 years old, married and employed.  Majority attained at least high school level of education.  Majority of the participants reported occasional experience of general stress and moderate level of financial stress. Loss of job was the most common stressor experience in the past year.  Occurrence of general stress was higher among females, younger age-group, and those who reached college level of education.  High to severe current    financial    stress    was    greater    among widow/widower/separated and older age-group.  While the relationship between psychosocial stress and physical illness had not been established in this study, there is a need to investigate demographics and psychosocial stress, and their implications in increasing adverse health outcomes in general, and heart and vascular disease risk in particular.

Link to the article: http://actamedicaphilippina.com.ph/
Impact Factor: Not yet available

Felix Eduardo R. Punzalan*, Rody G. Sy*, Olivia T. Sison**, Nina T. Castillo-Carandang**, Paul Ferdinand M. Reganit* and Elmer Jasper B. Llanes*
Department of Medicine*
College of Medicine
Institute of Clinical Epidemiology**
National Institutes of Health 
UP Manila 

Prevalence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Relation to Socio-Demographic Profile of the Life Course Study in Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology Study (LIFECARE) Philippine Cohort. Acta Medica Philippina, 48 (2): 62-69, 2014.

Catchy title of research: “CV RISKS”

Heart diseases remain to be the leading cause of death in the Philippines.  It is already known that it is triggered by several risk factors such as cigarette smoking, diabetes, elevated cholesterol, obesity and physical inactivity.  This report aimed to describe the distribution of the cardiac/heart risk factors in relation to socio-demographic factors in the LIFECARE Philippine cohort.  We recruited 3,072 apparently healthy participants.  Face to face interview, baseline clinical and laboratory data were obtained.  Diabetes occurred in 5%, similar across sexes, area class, educational attainment and employment status.  More smokers were male, employed or with an elementary level of education.  Hypertension was present in 14.5% and was seen more in males, urban dwellers, employed or with an elementary level of education.  Elevated cholesterol was seen more in males, living in the rural areas, employed or with a college level of education.  Obese participants were seen more in females, living in urban areas, and employed with a college level of education.  Overall, older, male and employed participants who are living in the urban areas have more cardiac risk factors.  Early identification of these risk factors and addressing treatment is fundamental in retarding the chain of events that lead to heart diseases.

Link to the article: http://actamedicaphilippina.com.ph/
Impact Factor: Not yet available

Elmer Jasper B. Llanes*, Rody G. Sy*, Nina T. Castillo-Carandang**, Felix Eduardo R. Punzalan*, Paul Ferdinand M. Reganit* and Olivia T. Sison**
Department of Medicine*
College of Medicine
Institute of Clinical Epidemiology**
National Institutes of Health 
UP Manila 

Where We Are Socio-Ecological and Health Profile of the Philippine LIFEcourse study in CARdiovascular disease Epidemiology (LIFECARE) Study Sites. Acta Medica Philippina, 48 (2): 47-55, 2014.

Catchy title of research: “WHERE WE ARE”

The Philippines is an archipelago composed of several islands, grouped into three.  Health service delivery includes both private and public.  This report aimed to describe the socio-ecological and health profile of the Philippine LIFECARE study sites, its health care services and leading causes of death/mortality and illness/morbidity.  A total of 3,072 participants aged 20-50 years old were included.  Study sites were characterized according to their geography, terrain and environmental profile, and available health care system.  Most of the participants were females with mean age of 35 years old.  Metro Manila was the most congested site.  Majority were rural barangays, located outside the town proper, and in lowland areas. One-fourth was along coastal area.  Almost all sites were accessible by public transportation.  Most of the areas had reduced forest cover, but were found to be relatively safe from environmental hazards. There was an unequal distribution of hospitals and healthcare professionals, most of them were concentrated mainly in Metro Manila. The leading cause of illness/morbidity was respiratory tract infection, while heart and vascular diseases caused most of deaths/mortalities.  The observed diversity of the study sites and its current health status and resources, may provide valuable information in translating the subsequent findings of the LIFECARE study into relevant policies and programs to address the health service delivery.

Link to the article: http://actamedicaphilippina.com.ph/
Impact Factor: Not yet available

Nina T. Castillo-Carandang*, Olivia T. Sison*, Rody G. Sy**, Elmer Jasper B. Llanes**, Paul Ferdinand M. Reganit** and Felix Eduardo R. Punzalan**
Institute of Clinical Epidemiology*
National Institutes of Health 
Department of Medicine**
College of Medicine 
UP Manila 

“You Are What You Eat:” Self-Reported Preferences for Food Taste and Cooking Methods of Adult Filipinos (20-50 years old). Acta Medica Philippina, 48 (2): 56-61, 2014.

Catchy title of research: “You are what you eat”

There were differences in preferred tastes of males (food that tasted “just right”, spicy) vs. females (salty); younger adults (sweet, salty, spicy) vs. those with less schooling who liked food which tasted “just right.” Smokers preferred spicy taste vs. non-smokers who liked sweet-tasting food. Adults who reported having had alcohol intake preferred spicy food. Those who reported feeling stressed liked savoury taste (sweet, salty) while those who were not stressed liked food which tasted “just right.” Cooking with oil was the usual and the most preferred cooking method. Younger adults and smokers liked to use oil in cooking. Food which tasted “just right”/moderate was most preferred by adult Filipinos with hypertension or metabolic syndrome (MeTS). Diabetics did not prefer sweet tasting food. More diabetics and those with MeTS usually use other cooking methods instead of frying. Eliciting self-reported taste preferences as well as the usual and preferred cooking methods is important for nutritional management and relevant lifestyle advice which healthcare providers should incorporate in their management of patients, especially those with hypertension, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.

Link to the article: http://actamedicaphilippina.com.ph/
Impact Factor: Not yet available

Rody G. Sy*, Elmer Jasper B. Llanes*, Paul Ferdinand M. Reganit*, Nina T. Castillo-Carandang**, Felix Eduardo R. Punzalan* and Olivia T. Sison**
Department of Medicine*
College of Medicine
Institute of Clinical Epidemiology **

National Institutes of Health 
College of Medicine 
UP Manila 

Socio-Demographic Factors and the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Among Filipinos from the LIFECARE Cohort. Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis, 21 (1): S9-S17, 2014.

Catchy title of research: “MetS”

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a collection of risk factors such as elevated blood pressure, elevated blood glucose, central obesity, elevated triglycerides and low good cholesterol.  The presence of MetS or the risk factors are shown to lead to the development of heart diseases. This report aimed to find out the occurrence of Mets and its component risk factors in the Philippine population of the LIFE course study in CARdiovascular disease Epidemiology (LIFECARE).  We used the two existing criteria in identifying MetS, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (mNCEP).  MetS is common in the Philippines.  Of the 3,072 participants aged 20-50 years old, about a quarter has MetS.  More cases are identified using mNCEP (25.6%) than IDF (19.7%), nonetheless both are related to older age, urban residence and employed status.  IDF missed 40% of males and 10% of females identified to have MetS using mNCEP. Socioeconomic development will lead to longer life expectancy and possibly a further increase in MetS. This is a particular concern in urban areas. Urgent action is needed to prevent the epidemic of heart diseases that is likely to follow.

Link to the article: https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jat/21/Supplement1/21_21_Sup.1-S9/_article
Impact Factor: (2014) 2.733

Nina T. Castillo-Carandang*, Olivia T. Sison*, Rody G. Sy**, Elmer Jasper B. Llanes**, Paul Ferdinand M. Reganit** and Felix Eduardo R. Punzalan**  
Institute of Clinical Epidemiology*
National Institutes of Health 
Department of Medicine**
College of Medicine 
UP Manila 

A Community-Based Validation Study of the Short-Form 36 Version 2 Philippines (Tagalog) in Two Cities in the Philippines. PLoS One, 8 (12): e83794, 9 pages, December 2013. 

Figure 1. Flowchart on patient recruitment for the community survey.

Figure 1. Flowchart on patient recruitment for the community survey.

The Short Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey is a generic instrument which assesses “functional health and well-being from the patient’s perspective”.[1] It is a 36-item questionnaire which has been translated to over 140 languages and is used globally to assess changes in health status as well as comparing the burden of illness in a population. The eight areas of perceived health in SF-36 include: Physical Functioning (PF), Role Physical (RP), Bodily Pain (BP), General Health (GH), Vitality (VT), Social Functioning (SF), Role Emotional (RE) and Mental Health (MH). The scores range from zero (0) to one hundred (100) with higher score representing better health status.

Link to the article: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0083794
Impact Factor: (2013) 3.534

Gilbert R. Peralta
Department of Mathematics and Computer Science
College of Science
UP Baguio

A Fluid–Structure Interaction Model with Interior Damping and Delay in the Structure. Zeitschrift für angewandte Mathematik und Physik, 67 (10): 20 pages, March 2016.

A coupled system of partial differential equations modeling the interaction of a fluid and a structure with delay in the feedback is studied. The model describes the dynamics of an elastic body immersed in a fluid that is contained in a vessel, whose boundary is made of a solid wall. The fluid component is modeled by the linearized Navier-Stokes equation, while the solid component is given by the wave equation neglecting transverse elastic force. Spectral properties and exponential or strong stability of the interaction model under appropriate conditions on the damping factor, delay factor and the delay parameter are established using a generalized Lax-Milgram method.

Link to the article: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00033-015-0611-1
Impact Factor: (2015/2016) 1.560

Gilbert R. Peralta
Department of Mathematics and Computer Science
College of Science
UP Baguio

Global Smooth Solution to a Hyperbolic System on an Interval with Dynamic Boundary Conditions. Quarterly of Applied Mathematics, 74: 539-570 , 2016.

We consider a hyperbolic two component system of partial differential equations in one space dimension with ODE boundary conditions describing the flow of an incompressible fluid in an elastic tube that is connected to a tank at each end. Using the local-existence theory together with entropy methods, the existence and uniqueness of a global-in-time smooth solution is established for smooth initial data sufficiently close to the equilibrium state. Energy estimates are derived using the relative entropy method for zero order estimates while constructing entropy-entropy flux pairs for the corresponding diagonal system of the shifted Riemann invariants to deal with higher order estimates. Finally, using the linear theory and interpolation estimates, we show that the solution converges exponentially to the equilibrium state.

Link to the article: http://hurwitz.ma.tum.de/foswiki/pub/IGDK1754/Preprints/PeraltaProbst_2013.pdf
Impact Factor: (2015/2016) 0.654

Tito M. Cabili and Virginia C. Cuevas
SESAM
Institute of Biological Science
College of Arts and Sciences
UP Los Baños

Cultural Practices, Beliefs and Productivity of Fishery Resource in the Island Municipality of Capul, Northern Samar, Philippines. Journal of Environmental Science and Management, 19 (1): 72-84, June 2016.

Catchy title of research: Culture, Tradition and Conservation of Fishery Resource in Capul, Northern Samar

Figure 2. Rapala (wooden baits) of different styles.

Figure 2. Rapala (wooden baits) of different styles.

 

Figure 3. Rambo, artificial shrimp baits twice the size of actual shrimps.

Figure 3. Rambo, artificial shrimp baits twice the size of
actual shrimps.

Fishing and farming are the main forms of livelihood of the people of Capul, a typhoon-prone island municipality in Northern Samar. The island’s inhabitants destroyed the original tropical forest of the island resulting to loss of biodiversity. The forest was replaced with a coconut-based farming system. Assessment of this farming system presented in two previous articles shows that it has no net negative impact on the sea grass community of the island. This present article examines the impacts of the people’s culture and practices related to fishing on the island’s fish resource productivity. Natives still believe on deities residing in specific places in the island. They observe minimal disturbance on these places considered as sacred. This respect for these sacred places may have resulted in turning these sites as fish sanctuaries. Fisher folks use only traditional fishing gears and methods. Peer pressure has resulted in significant decrease in the use of destructive fishing practices. Ban on sale of coral skeletons from the islands is also strongly enforced in one fishing barangay. Coral condition of the island is better than the rest of the country. Catch per unit effort (CPUE) for traditional fishing gears used in the island was assessed to be higher than in Bolinao, Pangasinan, a fish productive site in the country. These are indicators that yield of the fishery resource of the island is sustainable.

Link to the article: https://journals.uplb.edu.ph/index.php/JESAM/article/view/1489
Impact Factor: (2015/2016) 0.146

Anna Lena Lopez and Michelle Ylade
Institute of Child Health and Human Development
National Institutes of Health
UP Manila

Epidemiology of Japanese Encephalitis in the Philippines: A Systematic Review. PLoS One, 9 (3): e0003630, 17 pages, March 2015.

Catchy title of research: Epidemiology of Cholera in the Philippines

Fig 2. Geographic distribution of reported JE cases, suspected JE cases and seroprevalence surveys in the Philippines, by province.

Fig 2. Geographic distribution of reported JE cases, suspected JE cases and seroprevalence surveys in the Philippines, by province.

Cholera has been increasingly reported in the past decade. It is most feared because of its tendency to spread rapidly resulting in deaths in a short time, if appropriate treatment is not provided. For fear of trade and travel sanctions, countries were disinclined to report cholera, unless large outbreaks ensued. Although countries in Asia have been reporting cholera, it is believed that more cases are not being identified and instead being reported as acute watery diarrhea. Cholera is endemic in the Philippines however data on cholera in the country remained sparse, until 2008 when surveillance was strengthened. From 2008 to 2013, 42,071 suspected and confirmed cholera cases were reported in 87% of provinces and metropolitan areas in the country, confirming the endemicity of cholera in the Philippines. Poor access to improved sanitation was associated with cholera. On the other hand despite access to improved water sources, cholera remains to be seen. The latter is most probably due to the breakdown and non-chlorination of water systems. We identified areas where cholera has been known to occur in the Philippines, this will assist in the development and implementation of policies to minimize the morbidity and mortality due to this disease.

Link to the article: http://journals.plos.org/plosntds/article?id=10.1371/journal.pntd.0003630
Impact Factor: (2015/2016) 3.057

Ricky B. Nellas
Institute of Chemistry
College of Science
UP Diliman

The Promiscuity of Allosteric Regulation of Nuclear Receptors by Retinoid X Receptor. Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 120 (33): 8338–8345, 25 August 2016.

Figure 1. Binding of RXR and its cognate ligand 9c has different effects on TR versus CAR. (a) The negative heterotropic allostery of RXR(9c):TR(t3) complex (upper) and the positive heterotropic allostery of RXR(9c):CAR(tcp) complex (lower). The structure of the corresponding complexes are shown in panels b and c.

Figure 1. Binding of RXR and its cognate ligand 9c has different effects on TR versus CAR. (a) The negative heterotropic allostery of RXR(9c):TR(t3) complex (upper) and the positive heterotropic allostery of RXR(9c):CAR(tcp) complex (lower). The structure of the corresponding complexes are shown in panels b and c.

 

Figure 2. Method of CAMERRA can locate allosteric motions by tracking the correlated dynamics of residue−residue contacts. As shown in panel a, there are contacts breaking (red) and forming (green) between two residues (dark dots) and between the residue and ligand (light dots) during a simulation. Correlated contact formations between the protein and ligand indicates a cooperative binding (b). The correlation of a contact formation at one binding pocket and the contact breaking at another indicates an anticooperative binding (c).

Figure 2. Method of CAMERRA can locate allosteric motions by tracking the correlated dynamics of residue−residue contacts. As shown in panel a, there are contacts breaking (red) and forming (green) between two residues (dark dots) and between the residue and ligand (light dots) during a simulation. Correlated contact formations between the protein and ligand indicates a cooperative binding (b). The correlation of a contact formation at one binding pocket and the contact breaking at another indicates an anticooperative binding (c).

In this work, the structural basis of the positive allostery of RXR and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is revealed. By comparing the positive and negative allostery of RXR complexed with CAR and TR respectively, we reported the promiscuous allosteric control involving RXR. The promiscuity of RXR control may originate from multiple factors, including (1) the frustrated fit of cognate ligand 9c to the RXR binding pocket and (2) the different ligand- binding features of TR (loose) versus CAR (tight) to their corresponding cognate ligands.

Link to the article: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.jpcb.6b02057
Impact Factor: (2015/2016) 3.187