IPA Recipients for February 2018

Patrick S. Carradao and Florencio C. Ballesteros Jr.
Environmental Engineering Graduate Program
College of Engineering
UP Diliman

Phosphorous Recovery by Means of Fluidized Bed Homogeneous Crystallization of Calcium Phosphate. Influence of Operational Variables and Electrolytes on Brushite Homogeneous Crystallization. Journal of the Taiwan Institute of Chemical Engineers, 83: 124-132, February 2018.

Fig. 1. Scheme of fluidized-bed reactor for homogeneous crystallization.

Fig. 5. Percentage of (a) phosphorus removal and (b) granulation achieved by means of FBHC vs time on the treatment of 1500 mg/L solutions of phosphate at pH 9.0 with different molar ratio of [Ca2+]:[PO43−]T: () 1.0:1.0, () 1.2:1.0 and () 1.4:1.0.

Phosphate recovery from wastewaters is one of the major engineering challenges to securing the worldwide food production. Fluidized-bed heterogeneous crystallization of struvite has been one of the most considered technologies. Nevertheless, the recovery of other phosphate products could be of the major interest at industrial level. Thus, in this work we present the recovery of calcium phosphate salts as brushite by a novel fluidized-bed homogeneous crystallization (FBHC) process. The no requirement of seeds in FBHC reactor allows obtaining high-purity crystals. The operational parameters of the FBHC process have been optimized in order to achieve the higher degree of granulation and to obtain the most homogeneous distribution of granules sizes. Thus, the treatment of 1500 mg/L of phosphate at pH 9.0 with a ratio of 1.2:1.0 of [Ca2+]:[PO43−]T leads to the obtaining of ca. 90% of granulation with crystals of 0.5 mm of diameter. The influence of electrolytes typically found in TFT-LCD industry has been further considered. The characterization of the spheroidal crystals obtained allowed identifying brushite (calcium hydrogenphosphate salt) as unique crystal phase.

Link to the article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1876107017306508
Impact Factor: (2016/2017) 4.217

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Sarah Lynne S. Daway
School of Economics 
UP Diliman

On Decreasing Marginal Impatience, Stability and Monetary Policy in a Sidrauskian Economy. Metroeconomica, 69 (1): 86–108, February 2018.

This paper analyzes the long-run dynamics with which decreasing marginal impatience (DMI) is consistent with a saddle-path equilibrium in a Sidrauskian economy. With exogenous growth, this occurs with a strong substitutability between capital and money. Otherwise, diminishing returns to capital have to be stronger than in a non-monetary setting if capital and money are complements. With endogenous growth, saddle-path stability ensues when the rate of time preference (RTP) — the rate at which "impatience" is increasing — exceeds the rate at which the real economy is growing along a balanced growth path. Two monetary implications also emerge. One, DMI can be consistent with both a negative and positive long-run inflation-growth nexus. Two, under capital-money substitutability, the Friedman optimal rule might even fail to hold.

Link to the article: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/meca.12170/abstract
Impact Factor: (2016/2017) 0.475

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Kent Jason G. Cheng and Sarah Lynne S. Daway*
Institute of Health Policy and Development Studies
UP Manila
School of Economics*
UP Diliman

The Role of Domestic Financial and Economic Development in Financial Integration. Applied Economics Letters, 25 (2): 119-124, 19 January 2018.

Using advanced panel data regression techniques, we find that a country needs to develop its local financial sector and to have some level of economic development first before it can attract capital from abroad.

Link to the article: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504851.2017.1302054
Impact Factor: (2016/2017) 0.478 

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Lanndon A. Ocampo, Tiffany Adelaine G. Tan and Leahlizbeth A. Sia
School of Management
UP Cebu

Using Fuzzy DEMATEL in Modeling the Causal Relationships of the Antecedents of Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB) in the Hospitality Industry: A Case Study in the Philippines. Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management, 34: 11-29, March 2018.

This research aimed to identify the root causes, or antecedents, of organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) in the hospitality industry and to determine their relationship with other factors. Experts with key positions in top hotels and restaurants in Cebu, Philippines were asked to identify the OCB antecedents they have observed and experienced in practice. Using fuzzy DEMATEL to understand the causal relationships, organizational commitment emerged as the most prominent antecedent with the highest number of impact on eliciting OCB in employees, both given and received. Furthermore, human resource practices appeared as the most influential antecedent, which showed a higher degree of causality to the other antecedents. Finally, job satisfaction and employee engagement have the highest number of impact received, meaning they are more dependent with other antecedents in the list. These findings can serve as guidelines in making resource allocation decisions, employee performance evaluation and human resource strategy formulation, among others, for key decision makers in an organization.

Link to the article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1447677017301729
Impact Factor: Not yet available

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Laurence Marvin S. Castillo
Department of Humanities
College of Arts and Sciences
UP Los Baños

Monsters in the Pacific: The Philippines in the Hollywood Geopolitical Imaginary. Kritika Kultura, 29: 80-100, August 2017.

This essay analyzes how the Philippines is represented in the Hollywood giant monster film Pacific Rim (2013) and Godzilla (2014). The essay first discusses how the nation-state continues to be an important participant in the globalized expansion of the capitalist order, despite the presence of transnational political and economic oraganizations different regions of the world. It subsequently elaborates on how nation-state’s continuing involvement in the political and economical operations of globalization is represented in various films. The essay then examines the how the giant monster film genre has developed in relation to various concerns in the postwar period — from the anxieties caused by the nuclear war to the struggles during Cold War. Finally, the essay closely analyzes the two monster films in order to demonstrate how the problematic representation of the Philippines in these mentioned films has shown the country’s role as a passive subject of American control in the Asia-Pacific region

Link to the article: https://journals.ateneo.edu/ojs/index.php/kk/article/view/KK2017.02904/2558
Impact Factor: Not yet available

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Laurence Marvin S. Castillo
Department of Humanities
College of Arts and Sciences
UP Los Baños

The (Anti)Colonial Awit of Juan Tamad: Didacticism and Subversion in a Colonial Metrical Romance. Philippine Studies: Historical and Ethnographic Viewpoints, 65 (3): 357-386, September 2017.

In the early decades of the 20th century, a metrical romance – a poetic narrative rendered in verse form – on the life of the folk hero Juan Tamad was printed in Manila. This article discusses the different literary sources and influences of the text. It also embarks upon an analysis of this text in relation to the various political standpoints that prevailed during the Spanish and American colonial periods. It argues that the metrical romance contains complex opposing viewpoints and dispositions concerning colonialism. The article also traces hoe Juan Tamad is subsequently depicted in other popular cultural forms, particularly in the Juan Tamad films of National Artist Manuel Code.

Link to the article: https://muse.jhu.edu/article/671010/summary
Impact Factor: Not yet available

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Rebekka Volmer and Maria Rebecca Ferreras
Archaeological Study Program
UP Diliman

Did Panthera pardus (Linnaeus, 1758) Become Extinct in Sumatra Because of Competition for Prey? Modeling Interspecific Competition within the Late Pleistocene Carnivore Guild of the Padang Highlands, Sumatra. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 487: 175-186, 1 December 2017.

Fig. 1. Southeast Asia and the area of the Padang Highlands of Sumatra.

Fig. 2. Carnivore competition model. Characteristics of prey and predator agents, action procedures and interaction procedures programmed and simulated with Netlogo.

Leopards are fascinating large cats and spread throughout Africa and large parts of Asia. These elegant cats are unfortunately extinct in some regions because of hunting and habitat destruction. However, in Sumatra leopards became extinct already before historic times. Since tigers and Asiatic wild dogs are still present in Sumatra, and further, extinction of leopards already took place before civilization and historical times started, it is a question why leopards became extinct. Theories about the extinction of leopards in Sumatra are among others, that leopards were not able to stand competition to other carnivores, or even early Humans living as hunter-gatherers. In our study we tested with an agent-based model, if competition between the predators would have caused the extinction of the leopard. Our results showed that the competition the leopard is experiencing from the Asiatic wild dog and two other wild cat species, the clouded leopard and the Asiatic golden cat, were responsible for the extinction of leopards in Sumatra. The impact of humans on leopards was not very strong, so we conclude that prehistoric hunter-gatherer population of humans in Sumatra was not high enough to force leopards to extinction.

Link to the article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031018217300913#f0010
Impact Factor: (2016/2017) 2.578

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Alisha Wednesday B. Reyes
Department of Veterinary Paraclinical Sciences
College of Veterinary Medicine
UP Los Baños

The in vitro and in vivo Protective Effects of Tannin Derivatives Against Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Infection. Microbial Pathogenesis, 109: 86-93, August 2017.

Link to the article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0882401017304655
Impact Factor: (2016/2017) 2.009

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Melchizedek I. Alipio and Nestor Michael C. Tiglao
Electrical and Electronics Engineering Institute
College of Engineering
UP Diliman

Dynamic Source Rate Control for Cache-Based Transport Protocol in Wireless Sensor Networks. Computer Communications, 113: 14-24, 15 November 2017.

Catchy title of research: Towards designing a dynamic source rate control for cache-based transport protocols in Wireless Sensor Networks

WSN as widely deployed in Smart Grids.

Cache-aware approach for rate control mechanism.

The main functions of transport layer of the network stack is to guarantee end-to-end reliability and error control.  This means that the network protocol must be able to deliver all packets sent from the source to the intended destination.  In wireless sensor network, these objectives are more difficult to achieve compared with wired networks because of the higher probability of error due to interference and loss of connection due to the broadcast nature of wireless transmission. Cache-based transport protocols leverage the use of caching some nodes in the network to keep copies of the packets and if necessary retransmit them from those nodes closer to the destination than the source. This mechanism can improve network performance but will add complexity to the protocols. In this work, a dynamic source rate control algorithm that utilizes a cache-aware approach was developed wherein cache management policies are employed to notify the relative degree of packet losses and limit the transmission window size.

Link to the article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140366417305637
Impact Factor: (2016/2017) 3.338

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Francoise Neil D. Dacanay, Ma. Carmina Joyce A. Ladra, Hiyas A. Junio and Ricky B. Nellas
Institute of Chemistry
College of Science
UP Diliman

Molecular Affinity of Mabolo Extracts to an Octopamine Receptor of a Fruit Fly. Molecules, 22 (10): 1677, 12 pages, October 2017.

Figure 1. Chromatogram of essential oils extracted from mabolo fruit using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. The peaks are labeled according to each compound identified. (1) Methyl butanoate, (2) Ethyl butanoate, (3) Butyl butanoate, (4) Methyl benzoate, (5) Butyl benzoate, (6) Benzyl butanoate, (7) Benzyl alcohol.

Figure 3. Different binding sites were observed from the ensemble docking since the ensemble is a collection of different conformations of the protein. Here, probability (p) of the ligands to interact with several residues is shown.

Plant metabolites are good candidates for natural-product-based pesticides, also known as “biopesticides”. These metabolites are produced by various flora as essential oils for repelling or attracting insects. Mostly used in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industry, essential oils can also be good sources of biopesticides.
Octopamine receptors are membrane-proteins that are counterparts to the human sensing receptors. These proteins are mainly found in invertebrate nervous systems and are responsible for various physiological processes, i.e. locomotion, learning, ovulation, etc. Moreover, octopamine receptors only appear in invertebrates and absent in vertebrates, hence, this class of proteins is a good target for pesticides that only affects insect pests.
In this work, we have isolated compounds in the mabolo fruit to be screened against the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) octopamine receptor. Using computer studies, we have found that essential oil components from the fruit exhibits competitive inhibition (same binding pocket) with the putative ligand, octopamine. Furthermore, our results suggest that the best binding ligands have a specific motif, i.e. aromatic ring. This motif may be exploited in designing new pesticides that are eco-friendly.

Link to the article: http://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/22/10/1677/htm
Impact Factor: (2016/2017) 2.861

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